Posts tagged "Queen"

A bunting obsession

Bunting: Most commonly seen as strings of triangular pieces of fabric, plastic, paper, etc. with patriotic colors and flags. It was originally made to serve as signal flags for the British Royal Navy.

When I first got to England I didn’t know what it was or even paid much attention to it. Every English town we’ve visited, large or small, is decorated with it. From houses in the countryside to London streets, you can’t escape it.  Walking around Worcester, it’s everywhere. Strung across buildings, hung over streets and wound around lampposts. At first, I thought it was to celebrate the Queen’s jubilee but the event passed and it stayed up. Then I assumed it was the Queen’s visit to Worcester to open the library or in honor of the Olympic Games, but the decorations haven’t moved.

Now I never want them too. I’m in love.

I don’t know if it’s the unique British history or the cheerful colors and designs, but bunting makes me wish I hadn’t spent a penny on anything else since I’ve been here. Doesn’t matter if it’s waving proudly in the wind or hanging limply on a rainy day, it never fails to brighten my mood.

At first I only wanted to buy it. I saw some in Bath made of fabric with embroidered union jacks and crowns, but I couldn’t afford it. Shops in Worcester have it zigzagging across their ceilings and it slowly breaks down my willpower to resist every time I look in.

Then I realized I could make my own and the possibilities were endless.  It can be sewn, knitted, or crocheted out of anything imaginable. I don’t think I’ll even make it home from the airport without a stop at Hobby Lobby to buy supplies.

Sarah Ellis | Designer

Seeing the Queen is a moment I’ll never forget

Recently we turned out in the streets along with many Worcester residents to witness a historic moment: Queen Elizabeth II’s visit to open Worcester’s new library.

I don’t know about everyone else, but I was SO excited to see real-live royalty in person. Everyone lined up along the barricades were craning their necks to see the first sign of the royal car turn the bend. Even the skies were awaiting her arrival; the rain clouds cleared and bright sun shone down just as the car appeared.

When Her Majesty stepped out of the car, supported by the arm of her dashing husband Prince Phillip, I almost swooned. She was everything I pictured! Petite and adorable in her pink skirt-and-jacket combo, looking just like someone’s cute little grandma (or “nan” as they call them here)—the kind of grandma who always remembers birthdays and never burns cookies.

The Queen greets crowds of people as she makes her way into The Hive in Worcester, England.

Yes, these were the thoughts going through my head as I photographed the Queen’s 15-second walk from the royal car into the Hive, as the new library is called. As I sorted through the photos later in the day, I was struck with the thought that someday, 50 years from now, this photo will probably be framed on my wall and I’ll look at it and be instantly taken back to that spot on the side of the street where I was a mere 15 feet from the Queen of England.

And that is exactly why I love photography, because photographs have the power to transcend time and distances and immediately take you back to a moment that will never happen again.

Valerie Carnevale | Photographer

@vmcarnevale

Watching the Ceremony from the Midlands

By Pat Boylan and Michael Nauman  |  BSU at the Games

As the world gathered to watch the Opening Ceremony of the 2012 Olympic Games, all of the attention was understandably on London. A two-and-a-half-hour drive northwest, in Worcester, England, the excitement wasn’t quite like the host city, but it still had Olympic pep in its step.

Bushwacker Pub general manager Mark Humpage said the European soccer tournament just a month ago helped him judge expected attendance.

“We have had about double the attendance today for the Opening Ceremony. I think we will also have large crowds for track and soccer events,” Humpage said.

The crowded pub was focused on the television as the Ceremony played. Even the bartenders stopped to look at the big-screen as they poured customers’ drinks. And as the Queen made her appearance the city came to a halt. Unlike in the U.S., where President Obama may receive mixed reviews, the Queen had nothing but respect and cheers.

“The Opening Ceremony did a good job of representing our culture. They incorporated a great mix of history, music and the present,” Matt Penn of Worcester said.

Penn also believed the local flavor of the Olympic Games sparked his interest.

“Normally I pay very little attention to the Olympics, but I’ll definitely be watching.  I think the Opening Ceremony has done England proud.”

Despite a nearly unanimously positive reception, there was one disappointment expressed by many but summarized best by Penn.

“I can’t believe that we haven’t heard Adele. We’ve seen Mr. Bean, but not Adele.”

Pat Boylan is a senior telecommunications major and Michael Nauman is a junior sport administration major at Ball State University covering sports for BSU at the Games. Follow Michael, Pat and the BSU team at@patboylanbsu@itsmichaelbrah@bsuatthegames and www.facebook.com/bsuatthegames.

And don’t forget the tea towels!

On June 2, 2012, Queen Elizabeth II celebrated 60 years on the throne. She is the second queen in the United Kingdom’s history to celebrate a Diamond Jubilee. There were week-long festivities in honor of the Queen, but the Brits will continue to celebrate this once-in-a-lifetime event throughout the year.

A study done by MoneySupermarket found families are expected to spend around £823 million between buying extra snacks and drinks, attending festivities and buying souvenirs. With the Jubilee falling the same year as the London 2012 Olympic Games, British pride seems to be at an all-time high throughout the nation.

In Worcester (where I am currently staying) every shop I walk in has at least a dozen items on display for Queen Elizabeth II. The Brits have found a way to put the Queen’s face on literally everything possible, from shirts, scarves and clothing to dishes, pots and utensils, cups for tea, tea pots, calendars and of course an endless amount of books.

God save the queen!

Katelynn Thys | Features Reporter

@skyismylimit_kt