Posts tagged "Immersive Learning"

Daily Video: Sam Hazewinkel | USA Wrestling

BSU at the Games continues its daily video series introducing you to athletes from Team USA. Today, meet USA Wrestling’s Sam Hazewinkel prior to a recent practice in London for the Olympic Games. Hazewinkel competes Friday.

Sam Hazewinkel – USA Wrestling

Daily Video: Update from London

BSU at the Games provides this update on events to watch in the closing days of the Olympic Games. Featuring USA Track & Field’s Wallace Spearmon and USA Swimming’s Alex Meyer.

Update from London

Daily Video: Under the water with U.S. Synchro

Above the water, their routine is simple. Under the water, Mary Killman and Mariya Koroleva would say differently. BSU at the Games takes you “behind the scenes” with Team USA’s only two synchro athletes at the Olympic Games.

Under the water with U.S. Synchro

Daily Video: The Errol Spence Jr. Story

His journey began inside a run-down boxing gym in southern Dallas. Now the No. 1 U.S. welterweight boxer, Errol Spence Jr., finds himself fighting for a medal in the 2012 London Olympic Games.

The Errol Spence Jr. Story

Daily Video: Lance Brooks | USA Track & Field

BSU at the Games continues its daily video series introducing you to members of Team USA. Today, meet USA Track & Field’s Lance Brooks who didn’t begin his career as a discus thrower.

Lance Brooks – USA Track & Field 

You don’t need tickets to watch the Games in good company

With no tickets to an Olympic event or even to the Olympic Park, I assumed that I would just be watching the Games from the comfort of my own flat. Well, you know what they say about those who assume… I was wrong.

Many parks in downtown London are projecting the Olympic events on multiple 20-foot screens, Hyde Park included. They are airing the same BBC channels that I could watch in my flat, but somehow being outside with a crowd full of spirited fans makes watching Olympic television that much better.

On a typical Tuesday afternoon in London, if any day during the Olympic Games could be considered typical, I ventured out in hopes to watch women’s gymnastics in the park. Seeing that I was accompanied by one of BSU at the Game’s videographers, who had brought along a large camera, I began to get nervous that we would not be allowed inside the gates.

We finally had reached the security officer at the bag check. A bottle of water was thrown away, a shopping bag searched, a laptop scanned and then there was the camera. The officer eyed it for a moment, causing Charlotte and I to hold our breath, and then placed it back into her bag, giving us the OK to enter.

After grabbing a cider and finding seats on the mulched lawn amongst the crowd, our hopes to watch women’s gymnastics were gratified. About half an hour had passed when a man walked on the stage with a microphone. Hyde Park has been hosting concerts every night since the Opening Ceremony and will continue until the Closing Ceremony on Aug. 12.

On Tuesday, Rebecca Ferguson, followed by Cover Drive, performed on the main stage. Rebecca, with a sound similar to Adele’s, won the crowd over with her soothing love tunes. Cover Drive sang more upbeat and energetic melodies. Not recognizing either performer, I was hesitant during their first few songs. I quickly learned to “never judge a band by their first song,” as Cover Drive has become one of my favorite groups.

It was the perfect evening under the stars—enjoying live music and watching the Olympic Games. What more could two girls have asked for?

Needless to say, if you need to find Charlotte and me in the early night, chances are we will be having another perfect evening in Hyde Park.

Samantha Ashworth | Public Relations

Daily Video: USA Basketball All-Access

BSU at the Games provides this “behind-the-scenes” look from a recent USA Men’s Basketball Team practice in London. Kobe Bryant, Lebron James, Kevin Durant, Coach K and more visit with our crew.

USA Basketball All-Access

Seeing the Queen is a moment I’ll never forget

Recently we turned out in the streets along with many Worcester residents to witness a historic moment: Queen Elizabeth II’s visit to open Worcester’s new library.

I don’t know about everyone else, but I was SO excited to see real-live royalty in person. Everyone lined up along the barricades were craning their necks to see the first sign of the royal car turn the bend. Even the skies were awaiting her arrival; the rain clouds cleared and bright sun shone down just as the car appeared.

When Her Majesty stepped out of the car, supported by the arm of her dashing husband Prince Phillip, I almost swooned. She was everything I pictured! Petite and adorable in her pink skirt-and-jacket combo, looking just like someone’s cute little grandma (or “nan” as they call them here)—the kind of grandma who always remembers birthdays and never burns cookies.

The Queen greets crowds of people as she makes her way into The Hive in Worcester, England.

Yes, these were the thoughts going through my head as I photographed the Queen’s 15-second walk from the royal car into the Hive, as the new library is called. As I sorted through the photos later in the day, I was struck with the thought that someday, 50 years from now, this photo will probably be framed on my wall and I’ll look at it and be instantly taken back to that spot on the side of the street where I was a mere 15 feet from the Queen of England.

And that is exactly why I love photography, because photographs have the power to transcend time and distances and immediately take you back to a moment that will never happen again.

Valerie Carnevale | Photographer

@vmcarnevale

25 minutes for 5 quid—money well spent

After a confusing and frustrating run-around by the Olympic staff, I was finally about to see a field-hockey game in one of the arenas.

I wasn’t sure what I was going to do today when I woke up. I knew a couple of the other reporters wanted to go to the Olympic Park to check out the media press center and wander around to find stories. I couldn’t wait to walk around though, so I broke off from the group to find my own adventure.

This is how I ended up at the recycle ticket sales booth. I saw a line and someone saying that the second session of field hockey was going to be easy to get into for people who didn’t have tickets. For me it was the only way I was going to get tickets, since I was not a U.K. citizen.

For this opportunity I paid a hefty price. It was an hour-and-a-half wait in the line to get to the end. By the time I paid my 5 quid, it was already 4:45 p.m. and I had only eaten a muffin all day. But I had my ticket.

I then sprinted to Riverbank Arena to catch the end of the match. Luckily I got there for the last 25 minutes of it. It was a good amount of time for the money I spent, the teams that were in the match (Germany and South Africa) and just the atmosphere of an arena in Olympic Park.

The 25 minutes I saw was enough to experience what everyone else probably was feeling that whole time. Even though Germany was already winning, there were close shots that looked promising for South Africa to come back, and even shots where Germany could have further divided the final score. People were still on the edge of their seats.

Putting aside the frustration and the long wait, I participated in a crowd wave that made it around the arena twice. It was an awesome day.

Michael Kerkhoff  |  Sports Reporter

Patriotism in England

Traveling throughout England the past two weeks has made me feel alienated and welcomed at the same time. People go out of their way to help you if you ask, but I still feel I’m a tourist, never able to fully fit into the culture. I’ve chatted with locals about linguistic differences and the cuisines native to Britain. Finally I took in their sport.

I journeyed to Manchester with a group of three other guys to attend the USA vs. North Korea women’s football match. As the day progressed from London to Manchester, I began to feel more and more at home, beginning with an American couple waiting for the train with us.

They asked if we were joining them on the journey to the match, which we obviously were, decked out in full USA gear. They told us this is the only event they had tickets to before coming to England, yet they have managed to get tickets to several events since arriving. They taught me the valuable lesson of interacting with locals more than just passing glances. Many Londoners have extra tickets they are willing to give away to waiting foreigners, but without any contact you have no chance at nabbing admission.

The travel to Manchester was uneventful on the train, with half the group passing out after a long night. Arriving in Manchester brought more frenzied crowds of Americans completing the same pilgrimage as us. While waiting for the Metrolink (the city’s local street-car rail service) a pair of Brits approached us and told us not to buy tickets for the ride. They saved us a few pounds by telling us our game tickets are valid transport tickets also.

Not only did they help us save money, one of them wore an Alex Morgan jersey in support of USA Soccer. The American Invasion was almost complete. The jersey-wearer spoke of her excitement to finally see one of the world’s elite women’s football teams. Only Great Britain as an opponent would have stopped her from rooting for the USA women.

Arriving in the stadium is an experience, with nearly century-old entry gates adding to the history of the venue. Experiencing this with an American dominated crowd felt like an afternoon at Wrigley Field. Four out of five fans spoke with American accents. Never did I think I would hear more voices from home in England. For two glorious hours of football, it sounded and felt like a home match.

The greatest moment of the match was the National Anthem. In my career working baseball with the Fort Wayne TinCaps I have heard a couple hundred live renditions of our anthem. Never had I sung along or felt the impact of the words until hearing “The Star Spangled Banner” play gloriously in Old Trafford. I had chills up and down my body, and I proudly sung every word. Chants of U-S-A throughout the match and the wave circling the stadium completed the picture perfect American sporting event.

Returning home finished out my American day, when we sat next to four people who follow @BSUattheGames on twitter, and most of whom live in Indianapolis. The group shared stories with us about their adventures in London, while we shared our fun, including having a local offer us free tickets while eating lunch (again it’s all about interaction and being in the right place at the somewhat right time). They made the entire experience of doing journalism around the games worthwhile, by telling us they follow our posts closely, checking up on our latest tweets.

I don’t know what adventures await me, but wherever I go I will make sure I say hello or strike up conversations with sports fans of all nationalities.

Alex Kartman  |  Adviser

@ajkartman