By Pat Boylan | BSU at the Games

When it comes to women’s basketball, you would be hard-pressed to find a bigger name than Maya Moore.  Moore was the 2009 John Wooden award winner for best women’s college basketball player and took two national championships at Connecticut.

Moore credits a lot of her individual success to Indiana Fever forward Tamika Catchings.

“Tamika has been a role model of mine growing up,” Moore said.

Catchings will take part in her third Olympic Games this July playing for USA Basketball.  She’s been a face for WNBA for a decade and has been in six WNBA all-star games.

It will be the first Olympic Games, on the other hand, for Maya Moore, who is excited to work with Catchings and the veterans she grew up watching.

“Tamika is a tremendous leader and has helped me out in so many ways on and off the court. She’s really taken me under her wing,” Moore said. “Growing up a lot of people compared my game to Tamika’s, which to me was the ultimate compliment.”

Catchings’ veteran leadership will be key to the United States’ success in London this year. Catchings is the oldest player on this year’s team and is tied for the most Olympic experience.

As Catchings molds Moore and the rest of the team for future generations, they’ll also be looking for a gold medal this year, which would be five in a row for the Americans.

Women’s basketball begins its competition in London on July 28.

Pat Boylan is a junior telecommunications major at Ball State University covering sports for BSU at the Games. Follow Pat and the BSU team at @patboylanbsu@bsuatthegames and www.facebook.com/bsuatthegames.